The Compensation Unit of Human Resources is responsible for evaluating and classifying the duties and responsibilities of every employee's position. The following information will guide you through the classification system and procedures at UCSB.

There are two main categories of classifications at UCSB and a few sub categories. All non-academic staff employees are either REPRESENTED or NON-REPRESENTED. To be represented means to be covered by a collective bargaining unit contract of policies and procedures (also commonly referred to as a union) and to be unrepresented means to be covered only by the policies and procedures of the university (also known as the Personnel Policies for Staff Employees (PPSM)). The following chart illustrates these two main categories and the kinds of positions included in each category.

Each Collective Bargaining Unit (CBU) is governed by a unique contract or agreement. 

NON-REPRESENTED TITLES — 99'S

 

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REPRESENTED TITLES
COLLECTIVE BARGAINING UNITS (CBU):

CX (TEAMSTERS LOCAL 2010 – Clerical)

Admin Officer 2, (Blank) Assistant, Library Assistant, Child Development Center Teacher, Public Safety Dispatcher.

SX (AFSCME — Service)

Building Maintenance Worker, Cook, Custodian, Groundskeeper, Laborer, Parking Rep, Automotive Equipment Operator, Automotive Technician.

EX/PCT (AFSCME — Patient Care Tech)

Hospital (Blank) Assistant, Licensed Vocational Nurse, Dental Assistant, Dental Hygienist, Pharmacy Assistant, Radiologic Technologist.

HX (UPTE — Healthcare)

Counseling Psychologist, Pharmacist, Physical Therapist, Clinical Lab Scientist.

NX (CNA — Registered Nurses)

Nurse Practitioner, Clinical (Registered) Nurse.

RX (UPTE — Research)

Staff Research Associate, Museum Scientist.

TX (UPTE — Technical)

System Administrator, Business/Technical Support Analyst, Computer Resource Specialist, Editor, Writer, Artist, Lab Assistant, Development Technician, EH&S Technician, Electronics Technician.

K8 (Teamsters - Skilled Trades)

Carpenter, Electrician, HVAC Mechanic, Painter, Plumber, Locksmith, Skilled Trades Mechanic.

PA (Police Unit)

Police Officers only.

DX (UAPD - Physicians & Dentists)

Student Health Physicians and Dentists only.

 

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UCSB Classifications - Policy-Covered (a.k.a. Non-Represented)

Tier I and II employees are governed by UC Personnel Policies for Staff Members (PPSM) & UCSB Local Personnel Policies and procedures.

NOTE: This chart only highlights some of the commonly used classifications at UCSB. For a complete list, refer to the online Title Code System (TCS)

TIER I

Professional & Support Staff (PSS)  (Support Staff Grades 15-17)

(Blank) Assistant II/Supervisor, (Blank) Assistant/Confidential,   Library Assistant/Supervisor, Senior Storekeeper/Supervisor.

Professional & Support Staff (PSS) — (Professional Grades 18-24)

Financial Analyst 2-4, General Accountant 2-4, Applications Programmer 2-3, Student Academic Advisor 2-4, R&D Engineer 2-3, Supervisor 1 (Functional Area).

TIER II

Managers & Senior Professionals (MSP) — Grades 22-30

Manager 1-4 (Functional Area), Financial Analyst 5, General Accountant 5, Applications Programmer 4-5, R&D Engineer 4-5.

Senior Management Group (SMG) — Grades A-E

Chancellor, Vice Chancellor.

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Since supervisors and managers assign the work and determine the need for organizational changes and job restructuring, they are the ones who determine the general type of classification that a job will have. The role of the compensation analyst is to determine the specific classification series and proper level within that series once a job has been defined by the employing department. A job classification is assigned by the classification analyst based on the majority of duties and responsibilities in a given job.

Classification is based only on job assignments, not on the incumbent’s skill, knowledge, ability, or performance. Individual performance should be recognized through the merit system. A compensation analyst will consult with the supervisors and managers who want to reassign work in order to change a classification or insure that staff will not be working “out of class” Program growth or cutbacks, new technology, loss of revenue, management prerogatives, and departmental reorganizations are some of the many factors that affect how a department is organized and how positions are classified.

Classification reviews may be requested by the department head, the supervisor, or, in some cases, the employee*. Positions are also reviewed when they are:

  1. being recruited
  2. submitted for special review
  3. included in a survey of related jobs, or
  4. when there is a change in the series concept.

*Employees should make a reasonable effort to work with their supervisor on getting their position reviewed. If they are unsuccessful at working with their supervisor, they are advised to contact the Compensation Analyst for their area to discuss next steps.

 

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The Compensation Analysts at UCSB use a blended variety of methods and tools to evaluate and determine the value and level of jobs at the University.

Job Evaluation Methods:

  • Whole Job Comparisons — Job descriptions are slotted into grades/levels in a hierarchy by comparing the whole job with a series definition (Series Concepts) and selecting the level that provides the best fit. It is based on an initial definition of the number and characteristics of the grades/levels into which jobs will be placed. The grade/level definitions refer to such job characteristics as skill, decision-making and responsibility, otherwise known as compensable factors.
  • Job Ranking — Involves comparing whole jobs with one another and ranking them in order of perceived size or value to the organization.
  • Internal Benchmarking —This involves comparing the job under review with any internal job that is believed to be properly classified and paid.
  • Market Pricing — Directly pricing jobs based on job-to-job matching with external salary surveys, whether published or ad-hoc. Rates of pay are aligned with market rates, ensuring that pay is competitive.
  • Point Factor Analysis — This involved using specific compensable factors to evaluate relative job worth and places weights, or points on them. Factors reflect the dimensions along which jobs are perceived to add value to the organization.

Job Evaluation Tools:

Questionnaires — Questionnaires are used for the evaluation of some jobs in series such as SAO, CNT, and Analyst. These questionnaires are designed to obtain more detailed information about the duties and responsibilities of a position.

On-site Desk Reviews (a.k.a. Desk Audits) — On-site desk reviews are in-person interviews of an incumbent in a position by the Compensation Analyst. They are conducted for the purpose of obtaining more detailed information about the duties and responsibilities of a position.

Organizational Charts — Detailed organizational charts are a helpful tool when analyzing how a position relates to the organization as a whole.

Studies by Title — Occasionally, entire series of jobs will fall out of alignment with other positions of similar responsibility or with like positions in the market, necessitating a full study of the positions within that title.

 

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Supervision of the appropriate number of full-time, career employees (FTE) is necessary to receive a Supervisory designation. Supervision of limited appointment positions, employees on contract and student employees does not qualify a position for a supervisory designation. Since a supervisory designation may remove a position from collective bargaining units, Human Resources (HR) closely monitors the designation to make sure we are in compliance with HEERA (Higher Education Employer/Employee Relations Act).

What criteria does HR use when giving an employee a “Supervisory” designation?
HEERA provides criteria describing when a “Supervisory” designation may be used. HEERA requires consideration of the following:

  1. Number of FTE’s being supervised
  2. Number of “Supervisory Functions” performed
  3. Appropriate level of authority for decision-making
  4. Duration of the supervisory assignment (i.e., it can not be a short-term assignment)
  5. Type of work done by the potential supervisor (i.e., the work must be predominately different than those being supervised)

How many FTE need to be supervised to warrant a “Supervisory” designation?
The appropriate number of FTE that an employee must supervise is considered in conjunction with the entire HEERA Supervisory criteria listed above. Supervision of at least two (2) career employees (totalling 2.0 FTE or more) serves as a baseline requirement. 

How many Supervisory Functions need to be performed for a “Supervisory” designation?
Again, the Supervisory Functions are considered in conjunction with the entire HEERA Supervisory criteria listed above. HEERA defines six supervisory functions, at least three (preferably four) of which must be performed fully and independently to qualify for the supervisory designation:

  1. Hiring
  2. Performance Evaluations
  3. Reclassification/Promotion
  4. Discipline/Discharge
  5. Complaint/Grievance Resolutions
  6. Work Assignments

What is the process for designating an employee as a “Supervisor” according to HEERA?
Before approving a “Supervisory” designation, HR reviews the job description and may discuss the content and nature of supervisory work with the department. The department can begin this review by submitting a revised job description on-line (with the supervisory tasks described) and/or talking with their Compensation Analyst.

How does the department record the Supervisory designation?
If the Supervisory designation is approved, HR will assign a supervisory ERC (Employee Relations Code) code and input it on the on-line job description. When the approval email is sent to the department, the PPS preparer should input this ERC code into PPS.

 

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Some positions at the university are considered to be “confidential” and are therefore not eligible to be covered by a collective bargaining unit. If an employee meets the definition of “confidential,” then they are assigned a confidential ERC (Employee Relations Code) code by a Compensation Analyst. According to HEERA (Higher Education Employer/Employee Relations Act), employees must meet the following definition before being assigned a “confidential” ERC code:

Definition: An employee is confidential if he or she…

  1. is required to develop or present management positions for collective bargaining, or
  2. has duties that normally require access to information which contributes significantly to the development of management positions for collective bargaining.

Having access to other kinds of “confidential” information, such as personal employee data, personnel records, performance evaluations, payroll data, research discoveries, or other information that needs to be kept confidential for management or business purposes is not considered “confidential” for the purposes of designating a position as “confidential” with a specific ERC code.

Typically, employees with confidential ERC codes are found in departments such as Human Resources, Academic Personnel, Chancellor’s Office, and the head offices for Vice Chancellors, Deans and Provosts. Not all employees in these offices should have a confidential ERC code, however. Only those employees that meet the above definition will be designated as “confidential.”

 

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Every employee is assigned an ERC (Employee Relations Code) code by a Compensation Analyst upon having their job description classified. The chart below defines each ERC code:

CODE TITLE USE AT UCSB DEFINITION
A Manager — Not Confidential Must:
  1. Meet the “Manager” definition in Career Tracks
Definition of Manager:
  • Spends the majority of time (50% or more) achieving organizational objectives through the coordinated achievements of subordinate staff. 
B Manager — Confidential Must:
  1. Meet the “Manager” definition in Career Tracks
  2. Meet the “Confidential” definition
  3. Be approved by Human Resources
Definition of Manager:
  • Spends the majority of time (50% or more) achieving organizational objectives through the coordinated achievements of subordinate staff.

Definition of Confidential:

  • An employee required to develop or present management positions for collective bargaining,
  • And/or an employee whose duties normally require access to information which contributes significantly to the development of such management positions.

Restrictions:
Use of this designation requires prior approval by Human Resources.

C Supervisor — Not Confidential Must:
  1. Meet the “Supervisor” definition according to HEERA
  2. Be approved by Human Resources
Definition of Supervisor:
  • To be defined as a Supervisor according to HEERA, an employee must supervise the appropriate amount of FTE’s (2.0 or more) in areas such as hiring, performance evaluation, work assignment, reclassification and merit opportunities, disciplinary actions and complaint/grievance resolution. The employee must have the appropriate level of authority for decision-making, not be on a short-term supervisory assignment, and do work that is predominately different than those being supervised. Human Resources reviews the job to determine if the definition has been met.

Restrictions:
Use of this designation requires prior approval by Human Resources.

D Supervisor — Confidential Must:
  1. Meet the “Supervisor” definition according to HEERA
  2. Meet the “Confidential” definition
  3. Be approved by Human Resources
Definition of Supervisor: (see above)
Definition of Confidential:
  • An employee required to develop or present management positions for collective bargaining
  • And/or an employee whose duties normally require access to information which contributes significantly to the development of such management positions.

Restrictions:
Use of this designation requires prior approval by Human Resources

E All others — Not Confidential Used only when an employee is not a Manager, Confidential, or Supervising according to HEERA  
F All others — Confidential Must:
  1. Meet the “Confidential” definition
  2. Not be a Manager or Supervising according to HEERA
Definition of Confidential:
  • Anemployee required to develop or present management positions for collective bargaining
  • And/or an employee whose duties normally require access to information which contributes significantly to the development of such management positions.

Restrictions:
Use of this designation requires prior approval by Human Resources

G Not covered by HEERA (out of state) Must be working and residing outside of CA state.  
H Students in academic titles covered by HEERA Must:
  1. Be a student in an academic title
  2. Be in a title covered by the BX bargaining unit
Examples of titles include:
Readers, Tutors, and Teaching Assistants
I Students in academic titles not covered by HEERA Must:
  1. Be a student in an academic title
  2. NOT be in a title covered by the BX bargaining unit
Examples of titles include:
Graduate Student Researchers
J Excluded from Coverage Must:
  1. Be an employee in a represented title excluded from the bargaining unit
Definition of Exclusion:
  • Employees in a represented title that are excluded from coverage pursuant to the collective bargaining agreement

Examples of applicable titles include:

  • Physician with an appointment that has an FTE that is less than or equal to 2.5%
  • Physician Specialist with appointment that has an FTE that is less than or equal to 10%

Restrictions:
Use of this designation requires prior approval by Human Resources

 

 

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