Current Employees

Frequently Asked Questions

OACIS is UCSB's online system for classification functions, such as, creating job descriptions, updating job descriptions, and requesting reclassifications. It is no longer used for posting jobs or applying for jobs. Refer to the Employment section of the HR website for information on our new Talent Acquisition Management (TAM) system.

California's Higher Education Employee Employer Relations Act (HEERA) is the law passed by the California State Legislature that governs labor relations between public institutions of higher education and their employees.  HEERA gives UC employees the right to decide whether or not they want to unionize and have collective bargaining as the sole means of determining their wages, hours and working conditions.

The State of California's Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) is the administrative agency charged with implementing and overseeing the provisions of HEERA. PERB makes determinations about which units are appropriate for collective bargaining; conducts elections to determine whether employees in a given unit want to be unionized and engage in collective bargaining; and investigates, holds hearings, and makes decisions on whether or not unfair labor practices have been committed. 

After a union is elected to represent a collective bargaining unit, the University and the union engage in a negotiation process to reach an agreement (or contract) on the terms and conditions of employment for represented members of the unit. Every agreement has a duration period, meaning that the agreement expires after a specific date and the parties have to negotiate a new agreement. This next negotiation process is called "successor" bargaining because the parties are negotiating for an agreement that will succeed the current one. In some cases, agreement includes a provision called "re-openers." This means that the parties have agreed that they will re-negotiate only certain portions, or Articles, even though the agreement does not expire until a future date.

 

You can find out more about the processes for elections, decertifications and the history of collective bargaining in the FAQ's on the UCOP Labor Relations Web site.

Layoffs and/or reductions in time for employees in career positions are implemented when there is a lack of funds or lack of work, including lack of work due to reorganization.

Yes. If a career employee’s time is involuntarily reduced, it is considered a layoff, and the employee is entitled to layoff rights.

Refer to the Personnel Policies for Staff Members (PPSM) or the applicable collective bargaining agreements to find out whether severance pay is available. Contact Employee & Labor Relations at 805-893-4119 if you have additional questions.

In most cases, an employee who has been laid off or indefinitely reduced in time shall be recalled in order of seniority into any active and vacant career position for which the employee is qualified, when the position is in the same class and the same department at the same or lesser percent of time as the position held at the time of layoff. Preference for re-employment is generally applicable to any active and vacant career position at the same campus, the same or lower salary grade, and at the same or lesser percent of time, provided the employee is qualified for the position. 

In general, represented employees may elect either severance or right to recall and preferential rehire rights.  Non-represented employees may elect right to recall and preference for re-employment in lieu of severance.

Contact the Employment Office at 805-893-4662, to determine what effect the election of severance will have on an employee’s right to recall and preferential rehire.

Seniority for the purposes of a layoff is calculated by full-time equivalent months (or hours) of University service in any job classification or title. Employment prior to a break in service (separation from employment status) shall not be counted. 

In some situations, less senior employees (determined by amount of service with the University) in the affected classification may be retained based upon special skills, knowledge or abilities that are not possessed by other employees in the same classification and that are necessary to maintain the operations of the department.  Requests for out-of-seniority layoff must be reviewed and approved by Employee & Labor Relations.

For information pertaining to these benefits, review Indefinite Layoff - UCnet Resources or the Temporary Layoff- UCnet Resources.  For information about your health and welfare benefits.  Contact the Benefits Office if you have additional questions (805-893-2489).

For information pertaining to these benefits, review Indefinite Layoff - UCnet Resources or Temporary Layoff - UCnet Resources.  For information about your health and welfare benefits.  Contact the Benefits Office if you have additional questions (805-893-2489).

Any accumulated vacation earned through the last day of employment will be paid upon separation.

Accumulated sick leave will not be paid. If the laid-off employee has preferential rehire and recall rights and is re-employed during the preferential rehire period, all accumulated sick leave from prior service is reinstated upon rehire. If the employee does not have preference and recall and is re-employed after a break in service of less than 15 calendar days, all sick leave from prior service is reinstated. If the employee is re-employed after a break in service of 15 calendar days or more, but less than 6 months, up to 80 hours of sick leave are reinstated.

University employees are covered by unemployment insurance. Contact the California Employment Development Department for a determination of eligibility.

No, donations are required to be vacation leave.

No, your enrollment in the Catastrophic Leave Sharing Program must end before you receive any disability payments.

 

Some of the staff positions at the University of California, based on job title classification, are organized into collective bargaining units that are exclusively represented by a union or employee organization. California's Higher Education Employer-Employee Relations Act (HEERA) gives UC employees the right to decide whether or not they want to unionize and have collective bargaining as the sole means of determining their wages, hours and other terms and conditions of employment.  There are thirteen collective bargaining units (CBU) on the UC Santa Barbara campus.  More information about HEERA and the collective bargaining process is available on the Office of the President’s collective bargaining web pages and at the Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) web site.  PERB is the state agency responsible for oversight of HEERA and the collective bargaining process between the University and employee organizations/unions representing our employees.

When you were hired, your hiring supervisor or the employment recruiter should have informed you if your position is part of a collective bargaining unit and represented by a union.  If you are uncertain, please ask your supervisor, department personnel coordinator or business officer.  You can also search the Salary Scales by job title classification to determine representation.  The Salary Scales indicate whether a job title classification falls into a specific unit by code. (The campus often uses these codes as an informal reference for the bargaining units, e.g, CX, SX, TX)

If a position is not represented by a union, the job title/position is non-exclusively represented (often referred to by the code "99") and is covered by  Personnel Policies for Staff Members.

To determine the total value of your job, plus the value of your benefits, go to the Total Compensation Calculator on the UC systemwide website:

             Total Comp Calculator (http://ucnet.universityofcalifornia.edu/compensation-and-benefits/total-compensation-calculator.php)

If you feel that your position has evolved to a higher level due to a significant change in duties, additional duties being added, or if the way you are now expected to perform the majority of your duties has evolved to a new level, then your position may be eligible for reclassification.

Your position has been classified based on the majority of work being done in the position and an analysis of compensable factors.  Most jobs include a variety of duties, spanning a variety of levels and job series.  The Compensation Analyst is responsible for evaluating the duties based on compensable factors and determining if more than 50% are classifiable at a higher level. The most common compensable factors are complexity, freedom to act, consequence of error, scope (variety of duties), supervision, accountability for resources, and level of communications.

Here is an example of a clerical position and how a Compensation analyst might break it down:

25% Budget Assistance (__Assistant III)

30% PPS/Payroll (__Assistant III)

20% Conference Coordination ( __Assistant II)

10% Department Reception ( __Assistant I)           

10% Travel (__Assistant II)

10% General Clerical Assistance to Manager (__Assistant II)

5% Other 

-------------------------------------------------

Overall Classification level  = __Assistant III (55% of duties -> majority)

If you have evaluated all the functions and duties of your position, and you believe that the majority of work factors out to a higher level, then contact your Supervisor to let them know that you believe you may be working “out of class” and would like to have your job description submitted for reclassification. If your supervisor agrees with your assessment, then they would need to follow the on-line classification procedures for submitting a reclassification.  If your supervisor doesn’t agree with your assessment, they should give you an explanation.

 

If you have made a reasonable effort to work with your supervisor on the review of your position and you strongly disagree with their assessment of your job, you may contact a Compensation Analyst in HR for advice on how to submit your own reclassification.

No. The “50% rule” implies that at least 50% of your duties should be classifiable at a higher level in order to be eligible for an upgrade (a.k.a. upward reclassification).  Your position may already have a blend of levels in it and only need to change by 30% to cause a shift in the balance of the classification level.

Generally 30-45 days, however, if a desk audit is needed or union notice required, the process may take longer.  Other delays may occur as well due to variables in the Compensation Unit such as workload, staffing and other special projects.

A desk audit is an “interview” by a Compensation Analyst with the incumbent of the position in order to gather more information to aid in the evaluation of the position. Desk audits are not done by request. They are only conducted when a compensation analyst feels it is necessary to gain further information or clarification about the duties and responsibilities of a position that has been formally submitted for reclassification.

Yes.  Your supervisor has a right to assign new duties to you and you are expected to begin performing them upon receipt of the assignment.  If the new duties make up 20% or more of your position, your supervisor should add them to your job description and submit the job description to Compensation for review.

Career employees may be eligible for a pay increase when:

1. their position gets reclassified upwards;

2. a significant inequity in salary exists (see Equity Guidelines) and the department chooses to rectify it (not required);

3. they are promoted (via recruitment) to another position on campus;

4. there is a campus merit program; or

5. there is a union negotiated increase.

UCSB does not have any kind of bonus or incentive award program at this time.

The 25% maximum salary increase rule under PPSM 30 no longer exists.  It was removed from policy in 2018.

 

A salary structure with standard progression rates established within a pay range for a job. Employees may progress from step to step on the basis of performance or other negotiated reasons.

A salary structure with a minimum and maximum value to the pay range for a job. An individual progresses through the range based on performance or equity.

A range adjustment is an across-the-board salary increase affecting individual employees' pay and their relative step-based pay structure.

Red-Circling is when an employee's pay rate is approved to be above the established salary maximum for that position. Hence, the employee is usually not eligible for further base pay increases until the range maximum surpasses the employee's pay rate.

A promotion is the assignment of an employee from one position to another position, by way of an open recruitment, which is in a class having a higher salary range maximum. A reclassification is the change of title of an employee's current position to a title of a different class having a higher salary range maximum.

There are three categories under which an employee may be considered exempt.  They are administrative, executive, and professional.  These categories generally define an exempt employee as one who customarily and regularly exercises discretion and independent judgement in the performance of his/her duties.  Exempt employees must pass a Salary Basis Test, i.e., they must be compensated at a minimum salary that is at least $455/week (or $27.63/hr for exempt computer employees).

  • The Administrative exemption is for non-manual or office work directly related to management policies or general business administration.  Positions customarily and regularly exercise independent judgment and discretion more than 50% of the time.  Work is performed under general supervision and may require special training, experience, or knowledge. 
  • The Executive exemption is for positions whose primary duty is management of a department or subdivision in addition to exercising independent judgment and discretion more than 50% of the time.  Under the executive exemption, positions must directly supervise 2 or more full-time employees and have the ability to make employment and disciplinary decisions.
  • The Professional exemption is for work that requires an advanced degree and that is original or creative in nature.  Independent judgment and discretion must be excercized in these positions more than 50% of the time.   In addition, certain computer professions may be considered exempt under the Professional exemption when they meet certain criteria and are paid on a salary basis or an hourly basis that is at least $27.63/hr.

Exempt employees are defined as employees who, based on duties performed and manner of compensation, shall be exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) minimum wage and overtime provisions. Because of hourly pay practices, an employee appointed to a per diem position in an exempt title shall be treated as a non-exempt employee subject to FLSA minimum wage and overtime provisions.

Exempt employees shall be paid an established monthly or annual salary and are expected to fulfill the duties of their position regardless of hours worked. The workweek for full-time exempt employees is normally considered to be 40 hours, and for part-time employees the proportion of 40 hours equivalent to the appointment percentage; however, greater emphasis is placed on meeting the responsibilities assigned to the position than on working a specified number of hours. Exempt employees are not eligible to receive overtime compensation or compensatory time off.

Generally speaking, exempt employees are expected to be present at work during their scheduled work times in order to perform work that is essential to the unit’s operations. They are also expected to arrive at a certain time in order to assure that the workplace is properly staffed for business. Management should discuss with their exempt employees how their expectations of work relate to time spent at work. Management can ask exempt employees to inform them if they will not be at work during some hours of a typical work day. It is not only common courtesy, but it is necessary so that others who need to coordinate with that employee can be informed of the change in work schedule for the day. Exempt titles are identified in the University wide title and pay plan, located on TCS.

Non-exempt employees are defined as employees who, based on duties performed and manner of compensation, shall be subject to all FLSA provisions. Because of hourly pay practices, an employee appointed to a per diem position shall be treated as a non-exempt employee subject to FLSA minimum wage and overtime provisions.

Non-exempt employees shall be required to account for time worked on an hourly and fractional hourly basis and are to be compensated for qualified overtime hours at the premium (time-and-one-half) rate. Non-exempt titles are identified in University wide title and pay plans.

 

Yes, but the part-time employee must also be compensated on a salaried basis. For example, if an exempt employee has a 50% appointment, they would be paid at 50% of the established monthly rate. The workload should be adjusted as appropriate.

Eligibility requirements will vary according to the contract or policy. Please refer to the guidelines and procedures for the specific merit population.

Premium overtime is time and one-half for hours worked in excess of 40 hours in a workweek.

A Lead Worker is an incumbent that functions in a “lead” capacity for a group of employees working on a project or a specific assignment basis. The Lead Worker does not have full formal supervisory authority for staff assigned to projects; however, in order to complete projects/assignment must be able to schedule and control the daily working arrangements for a specified group of employees.

A Supervisor is an incumbent that customarily and regularly directs the work of two or more career employees working in a department/unit and has the authority to hire or fire other employees or whose suggestions and recommendations as to the hiring or firing and as to the advancement and promotion or any other change of status of other employees will be given particular weight.

The FLSA status has been pre-determined for each title within a classification series. However, individual positions or performance may require further analysis by Compensation to ensure that the position is assigned to the appropriate classification. As always, positions must meet the classification specifications in order to be reclassified. Positions will not be reclassified for the purpose of avoiding overtime payments.

A confidential employee is an employee who is required to develop or present management positions on collective bargaining, or whose duties normally require access to confidential information that contributes significantly to the development of management positions on collective bargaining.

Equity adjustments are salary changes outside of the normal salary programs (promotions, reclassifications, merits, etc.) to remedy salary issues such as external pressure in high demand areas, internal salary compression, and/or retention considerations. Equity adjustments are not granted to reward performance. For specific information on use of equities please consult the Compensation unit or our Equity Guidelines.

An administrative stipend is a form of compensation used to pay an employee who is temporarily assigned responsibilities of a higher level position. Please refer to "Temporary Job Changes" for more information on how to request approval for a temporary stipend.

For Non-Exclusively Represented Staff (PPSM): At the time overtime work is assigned, managers/supervisors need to discuss the method of compensation prior to authorizing the overtime. Management may offer either payment or Compensatory Time Off (CTO). The employee selects the method - payment or CTO.

For Exclusively Represented Employees: Please consult respective contracts for current practice.

See "Hours of Work/Overtime Guidelines" for more information on Compensatory TIme Off and election forms.

 

In certain serious circumstances, an employee may be placed on an investigatory leave to allow the University time to review or investigate the allegations without the employee in the workplace.   The purpose of the leave is to allow the University time to investigate the allegations or secure the worksite during an investigation.  Potential allegations of misconduct warranting an investigatory leave include but are not limited dishonesty, theft or misappropriation of University property, fighting on the job, insubordination, acts endangering others, or other conduct which warrants removing the employee from the work site. In general, employees must be informed in writing of the reason and the expected duration of the leave.  If you have questions about investigatory leave, please contact  Employee & Labor Relations .     

Under the California Higher Education Employer-Employee Relations Act (HEERA), a collective bargaining unit is a group of job positions/job titles with a sufficient "community of interest" that a union can reasonably represent the employees in the unit - particularly the negotiation of the employees' terms and conditions of employment.

 HEERA provides that, with some exceptions, collective bargaining units at the University are organized into systemwide units. This means that all employees in a specific collective bargaining unit, across all the UC campuses, are considered to be one unit. Other units (Skilled Crafts units for example) are considered a local, single campus unit.

 

Medical - You will find the monthly medical plan costs on UCnet.

Dental - UC pays the entire cost of monthly dental premiums for you and your family members.

Vision - UC pays the entire cost of monthly vision premiums for you and your family members.

Current Enrollments - Login to the UCPath portal to find your current enrollments and monthly deductions.

 

Health and welfare benefits begin on your date of hire, but it can take up to 30 -60 days before the medical, dental, vision and/or legal plans will have your new eligibility added to the insurance membership systems.

If you have an urgent health situation or need to fill a prescription, you can speed up your enrollment by calling the insurance member services. 

Please complete the following steps to speed-up your enrollment in the insurance membership system:

  1. Login to the UCPath portal to enroll/update/view benefits enrollments
  2. Call the health plan's member services and identify yourself as a new member who is calling to verify eligibility.
  • Ask if you are “active” in the insurance membership system.
  • If you are not, complete the following steps:
  1. Ask to speak with the membership unit or a member services representative who is authorized to use the University of California Carrier Eligibility Website.   
  2. Ask the representative to manually enter your enrollment into the insurance membership system.
  3. Ask the representative for your Member ID and Group Number.
  4. If you need a prescription, ask the representative to inform the pharmacy unit of your new eligibility.
  5. Ask how long it will be before your pharmacist/doctor’s office can access your new member information (it should be no more than one or two days).
  6. When that time frame has elapsed, you can pick up prescriptions or visit your doctor.
  1. Print a Temporary ID Card

You can print a temporary ID card on the following insurance websites after your membership has been activated.  Register as a new member using your Member ID and Group Number.

  • Health Net:  Select “Print a Temporary ID”
  • Delta PPO:  Select “Eligibility and Benefits”

Medical - You and each family member you enroll will receive a medical plan ID card.  The cards are mailed to your address in the UCPath portal after your enrollment is processed by the medical plan.  It can take 30 - 60 days for the medical plan to process new enrollments. 

Delta Dental PPO - Delta does not issue ID cards.   You can print an ID card from your Delta Dental member website.

DeltaCare USA - You and each family member you enroll will receive a DeltaCare ID card.  The cards are mailed to your address in the UCPath portal after your enrollment is processed by the medical plan.  It can take 30 - 60 days for the medical plan to process new enrollments.

Vision Services Plan (VSP) - VSP does not issue ID cards.  Participating VSP providers will confirm your eligibility with VSP.

Print an ID card

You can print an ID cards for medical and dental insurance after your membership has been activated by the insurance plan. Go to the  insurance website.   Register as a new member on the site using your Member ID and Group Number. 

 

Go to Find a Doctor on UCnet. You will find lists of participating physicians on each insurance plan website. 

HMO medical plans require you to select a Primary Care Physician (PCP) to manage your care. 

  • Each family member may choose a different PCP from the doctors who are contracted with your medical plan.  
  • When you pick your PCP you are also choosing a medical group (e.g. Sansum, Santa Barbara Select IPA, Buenaventura).  HMO physicians are affiliated with a medical group of specialists and hospitals that you may use for non-emergency care. 
  • The PCP you select will oversee your care and authorize visits to specialists in the medical group.

HMO medical plans require you to select a Primary Care Physician (PCP) to manage your care.  You may request a different Primary Care Physician (PCP) at any time.  You do not have to wait until Open Enrollment to change your PCP.  Be sure to confirm the “effective date” of the new PCP when you make the change.

  1. Call your medical plan’s customer service number to request the change. You can find the number on your medical ID card.
  2. Ask the insurance representative when the PCP change will be effective. If you call the medical plan before the 15th of a month, the change will be effective the first of the next month. If the change is made after the 15th, it will be effective the first of the next month
  3. Use your medical plan’s website to search for a PCP.  Your PCP must be located within a 30-mile radius of your primary residence or workplace and in your medical plan’s service area.
  4. Each family member may choose a different PCP from the doctors who are contracted with your medical plan.

When you pick your PCP you are also choosing a medical group (e.g. Sansum, Santa Barbara Select IPA, Buenaventura).  HMO physicians are affiliated with a medical group of specialists and hospitals that you may use for non-emergency care.  The PCP you select will oversee your care and authorize visits to specialists in the medical group. 

Your medical plan's mail order pharmacy is the most cost effective way to purchase medication that you take over a long period of time. When you order your maintanance medication by mail, you get a 90 day supply for the cost of 60 days at a retail pharmacy.

  • Go to your medical plan's website to find a Prescription Mail Order Form or call the Member Services number on your medical plan ID card.
  • You will need a new prescription to send with the mail order form.  Ask your physician for a 90-day mail order prescription with refills, if medically appropriate.

 

Try contacting one or more of the following contracted temp agencies:

 

AppleOne Employment Services (Administrative/Clerical; Accounting)
1636 State Street
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
www.appleone.com

 

Randstad, formerly Spherion Corporation (Administrative/Clerical; Accounting)
281 Magnolia Avenue, Suite 200
Goleta, California 93117

www.spherion.com
Manpower (Administrative/Clerical)
2236 S. Broadway, Suite D
Santa Maria, CA 93454
www.us.manpower.com
TeamPersona, Inc. (Accounting)
1407 Oakland Blvd., Suite 300
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
www.teampersona.com

You have 31 days from the "qualifying event" to add a family member to your benefits. Qualifying events include birth, adoption, marriage, or establishing a domestic partnership. To add a family member login to the UCPath portal: ucpath.universityofcalifornia.edu

Family members become ineligible for UC-sponsored benefits through divorce, the end of a domestic partnership, death, or when children become too old (generally age 26).  Whenever a family member loses eligibility to participate in UC-sponsored plans, it is your responsibility to de-enroll that family member. To make changes login to the UCPath portal: ucpath.universityofcalifornia.edu

 

 Generally, when a collective bargaining agreement expires and no new agreement has been reached, the University is required to maintain the status quo for terms and conditions of employment affecting represented employees in that unit.  “Status quo” is a legal term for the University’s obligation to generally maintain the same wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment that existed prior to the agreement’s expiration.  Thus, once an agreement has expired, the University usually cannot make changes to terms and conditions without giving notice to the employee’s union and potentially negotiating the change.  Management actions that may require a notice/negotiation obligation include: reclassifications, transfers, involuntary changes in employee’s hours, changes in departmental procedures related to ability to accrue comp time in lieu of overtime, scheduling overtime, vacation, taking sick leave, and other work rule changes.      

 Notably, not everything related to wages, hours, and terms and conditions of employment is subject to bargaining or to “status quo.”  However, departments planning to make changes affecting employees in bargaining units now in status quo should contact the appropriate Employee and Labor Relations Specialist to review plans and coordinate any required notices prior to implementing any such changes. 

Full-time employees are eligible for holiday pay if the holiday occurs during an approved leave of absence, a temporary layoff, or a furlough that does not exceed twenty (20) calendar days (including holidays).  Please consult PPSM Absence From Work or the applicable collective bargaining agreement for more information about holiday pay for full-time and part-time exempt and non-exempt employees. 

In general, a full-time non-exempt employee must be on pay status the day before the holiday and the first scheduled work day after the holiday to be eligible to receive compensation for the holiday.  An employee on an approved leave of absence without pay on the day before or the first scheduled work day after the holiday is considered to be on pay status and is eligible for the holiday pay as long as the unpaid leave does not exceed the time period specified in the contract or policy. Non-exempt employees who have been suspended for disciplinary reasons for a period that includes or immediately precedes or follows a holiday is not eligible for holiday pay for that holiday.  Non-exempt employees who have an unauthorized absence immediately preceding or following a holiday is also not eligible for holiday pay for that holiday.  Please consult PPSM Absence From Work or the applicable collective bargaining agreement for more information about holiday pay for full-time and part-time non-exempt employees.

Full-time Policy-covered exempt employees are eligible for holiday pay if they are on pay status during the week in which the holiday occurs.  Please consult the applicable collective bargaining agreement for information about holiday pay for represented exempt employees. 

You have a variety of options for continuing your UC benefits. To find out what these options are please see Your Guide to UC Disability Benefits. For more information, please contact the Leave of Absence Coordinator.

To view or de-enroll from benefits login to the UCPath portal.

You should discuss your need for time off with your supervisor, however, medical diagnosis is private information and does not need to be shared with anyone.

For information and to request a leave of absence, visit the Leave of Absence website. Requests for leave are sent to the Leave of Absence Coordinator through the HR ServiceNow portal.

If the leave is for your own serious health condition, you may want to File a Claim for disability benefits.

The Leave of Absence Coordinator administers all staff leaves, providing guidance and counseling on leave entitlements, pay options, and resources. For more information, please contact the Leave of Absence Coordinator.

Collective bargaining is a bilateral decision-making process involving direct negotiations, in which the University and the exclusive representative of the employees (usually called a “union”) determine wages, hours of work and other terms and conditions of employment for all employees in the bargaining unit. 

During this process, the parties meet and exchange proposals and counter-proposals.  Pursuant to the Higher Education Employer Employee Relations Act (HEERA), the parties are required to meet and negotiate in good faith (fairly consider the proposals of the opposing side and not dismiss them outright) and prohibits the parties from engaging in regressive bargaining (making their proposals or counter-proposals worse than prior proposals).  

Collective bargaining agreement, union contract and memorandum of understanding (MOU) are all terms that refer to a written, mutually binding agreement that results from direct negotiations between the University and the exclusive representative for a group of employees.  The agreement, contract or MOU sets wages, hours and other terms and conditions of employment for an agreed-upon period of time.

The exclusive representative for a group of employees (aka union) and the University develop and present initial proposals to each side prior to the start of collective bargaining negotiations. The initial proposals are generally changes or new contract provisions that each side would like to achieve through negotiations.

After the University and exclusive representative for a group of employees (aka union) submits a notice of intent to bargain and exchange initial proposals, the initial proposals are made available for public viewing at a stated time and place prior to the start of negotiations.   This allows the general public an opportunity to review and comment on initial proposals. 

If the University and the exclusive representative for a group of employees (aka union) are unable to reach an agreement through collective bargaining, negotiations may be declared at an impasse. This means that neither side is willing to compromise further on any of the outstanding issues. The State of California's Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) verifies whether or not the parties are at impasse and, if so, the State Mediation and Conciliation Services appoints an independent person to mediate between the parties.  If the mediator is unable to persuade the parties to compromise, then a fact-finding panel is created. Each party appoints one person to serve on the panel and PERB provides a list of independent arbitrators from which the parties mutually select one to chair the panel. This panel hears presentations from each side and then issues a fact-finding report.  However, the report is only advisory.

If the parties are still unable to agree after the completion of fact-finding and the report is issued, the University is permitted to impose or unilaterally implement terms and conditions of employment, as long as such terms were “reasonably contemplated’ with the University’s last, best and final offer.

If an agreement is reached in collective bargaining negotiations between the University and the exclusive representative for a group of employees (aka union), it is called a Tentative Agreement or T.A. because it is not put into effect until each side has ratified (or voted to approve) it.  The Regents of the University of California ratify for the University and union members (generally voting rights are only extended to dues paying members of the union) vote to ratify for the union.

An Unfair Labor Practice charge or ULP is a charge filed with the California Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) that either the University or the exclusive bargaining agent (union) has violated the Higher Education Employer-Employee Relations Act (HEERA). 

A work stoppage by a group of employees intended to express a grievance, enforce a demand for higher wages or for other changes in conditions of employment, obtain recognition, or resolve a dispute with management.

No employee is ever obligated to strike. Unions are legally prohibited from threatening or coercing members in other ways to keep them from coming to work. Some unions can fine dues-paying members (but not non-members) for working during a strike. A union member who does not want to strike may contact her/his union directly to inquire about possible fines. UC will not deduct fines from an employee’s paycheck.

You will not be paid if you fail to report for work as scheduled.  In additions, your benefits may be affected depending on the percentage of time worked in a particular pay period.  Please refer to the terms of the applicable collective bargaining agreement.

If an employee does not report to work as assigned during a strike, UC will presume — absent prior authorization or medical certification — that her/his work absence during a strike period is strike related. Employees who are absent from work without authorization during a strike will not be paid for the absence. As is always the case, authorization for an absence from work (e.g., vacation leave or compensatory time) may or may not be granted, depending on operational necessity and without regard to the employee's reason for the requested leave.

Generally, a career employee is in a probationary status for the first six months of employment at UC Santa Barbara.   (Police Officers are on probationary status for one year.)  In some cases, the probationary period may be extended up to three months.  Once an employee completes probation, s/he is a regular career status employee.  A career employee will not serve another probationary period unless s/he is re-hired after a break in service from University employment. 

 Generally, a career employee is in a probationary status for the first six months of employment at UC Santa Barbara.   (Police Officers are on probationary status for one year.)  In some cases the probationary period may be extended up to three months.  Once an employee completes probation, s/he is a regular career status employee.  A career employee will not serve another probationary period unless s/he is re-hired after a break in service from University employment. 

In general, the probationary period ends six months from the starting date of employment.  The probationary period is based on actual days of work, so any holidays, sick, vacation or unpaid absences taken during the probationary period do not count towards the probationary period.  

At the conclusion of the probationary period, the employee may receive written notification of the successful completion of the probationary period using the Probationary Period Report Form. The employee should receive a copy of the completed Probationary Period Report form. The original form should be filed in the employee’s departmental personnel file. (Human Resources does not retain a copy centrally.) Typically, new employees should also receive a written performance review at the mid-point and conclusion of the probationary period.

An employee’s probationary status may be extended by an additional three months. Probationary employees must be advised, in writing, of the reasons for the extension before the probationary period ends.  A decision to extend probation requires review and approval by Employee & Labor Relations prior to implementation.

If you have lost your insurance ID card you can request a replacement card by:
1) calling the plan's member services number or 
2) sign-in to the insurance plan's member website.  You can also print a temporary medical ID card from the insurance plan's member website.
 

Not all insurance plans issue ID cards:

  • Medical, DeltaCare dental and ARAG legal plan mail ID cards to members.
  • Delta Dental PPO ID cards are available on the Delta member website.
  • VSP does not issue ID cards. Participating VSP providers will confirm your eligibility directly with VSP.

You can find insurance contacts on the UCnet website.  

No. However, if you have them you may be required to use up to 22 days of accrued sick leave. You do not have to use vacation, but you can choose to do so during your waiting period to remain at full pay.

No. Although it's a state-funded organization, UC is not a government agency.

No. UCSB does not pay into State Disability, however, if you have been employed with UC less than 18 months (from your date of disability), then you should apply because you may be eligible for SDI benefits from your previous employment.

The Employment Development Department (EDD) will contact UCSB to complete the Employer's portion of the application. On your SDI application, please use address: UCSB Human Resources, 3101 SAASB, Mail Code 3160, Santa Barbara, CA 93106

No. UC has its own disability insurance, administered by Lincoln Financial (formerly Liberty Mutual).

Also, UC does not have paid Family Medical Leave like those employees who pay into State Disability Insurance, instead UC employees can use sick leave and vacation pay.

For more information, see Your Guide to Disability Benefits.

The Leave of Absence Coordinator administers all staff leaves, providing guidance and counseling on leave entitlements, pay options, and resources.

Once an employee mentions that they are taking leave for their own, or their family member's, serious health condition, the Supervisor or Department Representative should start the FML process by referring the staff employee to the Leave of Absence website to request a leave of absence through the HR ServiceNow portal.

If your employee is medically unable (e.g. hospitalized) to complete a request, the supervisor can login to HR ServiceNow and submit a request for leave on behalf of the employee.

The Leave of Absence Coordinator will provide the employee with the necessary paperwork and provide the employee's supervisor with a copy of the documents (no diagnosis information will be shared).

The Leave of Absence Coordinator will inform the supervisor of any changes to the employee's expected return date.

If you have any questions, please contact the Leave of Absence Coordinator.

FML leave entitles eligible employees to take unpaid, job-protected leave for family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Job protection, continuation of the UC contribution to your health benefits for up to 12 weeks. Employees are also entitled to return to their same or an equivalent job at the end of their FML leave.

FML and sick leave run together. FML is the (unpaid) leave entitlement and sick leave is used to receive income.  UC is required by federal law to designate a qualifying leave as FML.

No. Medical diagnosis is personal and private information. If someone voluntarily shares this information with you, it should be kept confidential.

Another type of leave may be available. Contact the Leave of Absence Coordinator to discuss available options.

The department tracks an employee's FML hours.

Please use the employee's Kronos time card and the FML Usage Tracking Calculator to track an employee's FML time. The Leave of Absence Coordinator may periodically request this information.

For assistance with Kronos entries, please refer to Updating Kronos for an Employee on a Leave of Absence.

If you have any questions, please contact the Leave of Absence Coordinator.

Your disability period begins on the first day your doctor determines you are unable to work because of a serious medical condition.

The waiting period is the period of time in which disability benefits are NOT paid. 

You are required to use up to 22 days of accrued sick leave, if you have them. If you do not have enough sick leave to cover your waiting period you may use your vacation or compensatory time. Talk to the Leave of Absence Coordinator about what paid leave you want to use. Please see Your Guide to UC Disability Benefits for more information.

Types of Supervision

Level of supervision is determined by the way in which work is assigned, when it is reviewed, how it is reviewed, and what guidelines, prototypes and protocols are available.

Definitions of Types of Supervision Received:

  • Close Supervision — indicates that the incumbent is assigned duties according to specific procedures. Work is checked frequently, and in addition there may be formal training.
  • Supervision — indicates that the incumbent performs a variety of routine duties within established policies and procedures or by referral to the supervisor’s guidelines.
  • General Supervision — indicates that the incumbent develops procedures for performance of variety of duties; or performs complex duties within established policy guidelines.
  • Direction — indicates that the incumbent establishes procedures for attaining specific goals and objectives in a broad area of work. Only the final results of work done are typically reviewed. Incumbent typically develops procedures within the limits of established policy guidelines.
  • General Direction — indicates that the incumbent receives guidance in terms of broad goals and overall objectives and is responsible for establishing the methods to attain them. Generally the incumbent is in charge of an area of work, and typically formulates policy for this area but does not necessarily have final authority for approving policy.

Personnel Policies for Staff Members (PPSM) and most of the collective bargaining agreements have provisions for non-exmpt employees to take paid administrative leave to vote in general elections or primaries.  In general, non-exempt employees may take up to two (2) hours of paid leave to vote in primary or general elections.  This provision only applies where an employee is scheduled to work eight (8) hours on Election Day and does not have time to vote outside of scheduled working hours.  Please consult PPSM- Absence from Work- for policy-covered staff or the applicable collective bargaining agreement (voting provisions are typically in the Leaves of Absence article) for represented employees.  

When you are receiving disability income from Liberty Mutual, you will be on "leave without salary" from UC which means that you will not be receiving a paycheck from UC.

The UC Contribution to your health benefits will continue. The employee contribution to your benefits that are normally taken out of your paycheck can continue to be paid by you.

You have a variety of options for continuing your UC benefits. To find out what these options are please see Your Guide to UC Disability Benefits. For more information, please contact the Leave of Absence Coordinator.

To view or de-enroll from benefits login to the UCPath portal.

The pregnancy disability period is generally 2 weeks prior to the estimated due date and 6 weeks after the child's actual birth (or 8 weeks for C-section).

If for medical reasons your treating provider recommends that you need to be off work earlier than the 2 weeks prior to the due date, then your pregnancy disability period starts the day you are not able to work. Alternately, if you are able to continue to work during the 2 weeks prior to the estimated due date, the pregnancy disability period (after the baby's birth) will not extend by 2 weeks. In other words, the disability period may have started sooner or later than the usual 2 weeks prior, however it will still end 6 weeks after the child's actual birth (or 8 weeks for C-section) unless you continue to have a pregnancy-related disability.

For more information, please see the Pregnancy, Newborn Child and Adopted Child fact sheet.

Yes, drug and alcohol counseling is a large part of ASAP services. We offer assessment, treatment, referrals, and assistance in rehabilitation placement, as well as work re-entry support if necessary.